Global Engineering

6 Biomedical Breakthroughs That Revolutionized Medicine

Biomedical engineering is a specialized field of engineering that involves the design of both procedures and devices that can improve the lives and well-being of patients.

Such innovations also allow doctors and surgeons to more effectively solve healthcare problems, leading to a healthier population overall. Here are 5 of the world’s greatest biomedical breakthroughs that changed the industry for the better. Continue reading “6 Biomedical Breakthroughs That Revolutionized Medicine”

What Will It Take To Live on Mars?

When Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin became the first people to set foot on the moon in July 1969, no one could’ve predicted that we would one day be having serious conversations about not only visiting another planet, but actually populating it. As technology and engineering continue to advance, we have started to see the possibility of perhaps forming a colony on Mars, but there are a variety of factors which need to be addressed first such as how sustainable it really is. Here is what it will take to live on Mars.

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Life Saving Engineering Ideas That Changed The World

For hundreds of years engineers have been working on medical projects that are designed to make our lives easier and healthier. These life saving ideas came to be after much research, and they continue to change our lives in so many ways.

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The Different Types of Engineering

Engineering is an extremely expansive subject, and there are many different types of engineering to choose from. This can be a bit of a problem for those that are trying to choose what type of engineering to begin studying.

Almost all kinds of engineering involve solving problems, creating solutions to those problems, and then putting the solutions into practice.

For those that are looking to break into the engineering world for the first time, these are the top branches of the subject that are popular right now.

Aerospace Engineering

This branch deals with the design, construction, testing, research, development, and technology of all things that can fly. It’s a math-intensive form of engineering, and can take a number of years to acquire an adequate degree or certification.

Those that wish to begin studying aerospace engineering will need to be strong in math, physics, and problem solving, and need to have a keen interest in the mechanics of modern flight or space travel.

Computer Engineering

Computer engineering involves the design, construction, and prototyping of hardware and software computer systems. This is a combination of computer science and electrical engineering, and it’s possible to get into the field by studying one or both of these.

It’s a fascinating branch of study, and sees the engineer enter the world of modern computing, dealing with creating new and powerful systems that may eventually be released into the public domain, such as video games, or online casino Singapore platforms.

Electrical Engineering

Electrical and electronic engineering is concerned with the application of electricity into a number of different ways, such as electrical infrastructure or simple electronic design, support, and repair. It’s a field that has seen growth in recent years as more and more countries seek out qualified electricians and engineers to keep their power grids running smoothly.

Those that wish to get into the world of electrical engineering will need to have an interest in how electricity works, how it can be applied to different systems. Modern electrical engineering puts a lot of focus into creating circuits, such as those used by computers.

Chemical Engineering

Chemistry is an extremely interesting field of study, and deals with chemical and biological processes that are used to create substances and materials.

There are many sub-fields of study in the chemical engineering world, where some engineers might be responsible for creating modern medicines, while others may be involved with the refinement of fuels or the development of new energy sources.

It’s perhaps one of the broadest of the engineering fields, and would be best suited to those that have a strong interest in microbiology, biochemistry, biology, economics, and mathematics.

Civil Engineering

This type of engineering is directly linked to the buildings and infrastructure that we see around us.

This can be either on a small scale, such as the creation and development of buildings and roads, or on a much larger scale, such as nationwide transportation or water supply networks. Those in this field sometimes undertake architectural studies.

The 5 Best Books for Engineering Enthusiasts

The world of written literature is very broad indeed, so it stands to reason that even engineering enthusiasts will find a wide selection of books that suit their individual tastes perfectly.

Books are an endless source of knowledge and entertainment as well, and if you want to learn as much as possible about engineering and science, then they should be your go-to guides!

Here are 5 must read books that every engineer should pick up at least once in their lives.

#1: Zero to One – Peter Thiel

This is an essential read on economics, start-ups, business design, and the future of technology. Engineering and the business world are closely interlinked, and this book puts their links into perspective while teaching you how to build your business skills as you build new things.

The book also speaks about productivity, effectiveness and efficiency, shedding light on these topics in a whole new way. Zero to One is all about teaching you how to be effective at business, engineering and science to achieve the best possible results in the field you are passionate about.

#2: Engineer to Win – Caroll Smith

Smith is a foremost expert in the field of racing technology, and she covers a wide range of racing car forms and topics for those who are interested in the mechanical side of things. This book explains and analyses topics like metal fatigue, metallurgy and the general technology of different materials, along with more niche topics like stress relief, heat treatment, aerodynamics, brakes, tools, and ground effects.

Any book written by a legend in the Formula-1 community has got to be worth a read, and this one is particularly succinct and easy to understand. If you are interested in mechanical, aerospace, systems, materials, or Mechatronics engineering, this one is for you.

#3: Set Phasers on Stun – SM Casey

This book was recommended to first-year systems design engineers at Waterloo to give them a good framework for their studies. The gist of the book covers that confusing moment when you have designed something and for some reason, everything starts to go wrong.

In order to correct this, you will need to understand the underlying complexity of what you have designed, and this often means including an interface between the user and the system at hand.

Experts have hailed this is a very important read due to the lasting impression it leaves, especially in terms of the importance of safety and accuracy in the engineering world.

#4: An Astronaut’s Guide to Life — Chris Hadfield

Long-time astronaut and Chief of the ISS Chris Hadfield has managed to take space travel from a reserved science to a public spectacle that has changed the face of astronomy forever. His novel is packed with insights on happiness, determination and commitment, as well as what it takes to be an astronaut, both among the stars and back on home terrain.

It might not be a factual tome packed with engineering information, but An Astronaut’s Guide to Life touches on the more emotional side of the craft, especially for those whose jobs entail space travel, plenty of risk, and a distinct lack of online slots Singapore fun.

#5: The Design of Everyday Things – Donald Norman

This classic engineering book has been through a number of editions to date, as people just can’t get enough of its amazing array of information. It focuses on the design process, but also on ergonomics, people, and the way we use everyday objects.

This book might just change the way you think about the products you use on a daily basis, and also about your part in creating new products for others to use and enjoy.

5 World Famous Civil Engineers

The work of today’s civil engineers would be a lot more challenging were it not for the forefathers of civil engineering whose innovations changed the world forever.

Through their discovery and clarification of even the most fundamental principles of the practise, these now world famous civil engineers made incredible contributions to the Industrial Revolution and beyond.

John Smeaton

Known as the “Father of Civil Engineering”, John Smeaton was born in Leeds in 1724 and after a short career in law, became a maker of mathematical tools.

Through his pioneering work on the mechanics of watermills and windmills, Smeaton applied both his theoretical and practical knowledge in order to greatly increase the efficiency of watermills, thereby accelerating the early Industrial Revolution.

Responsible for an array projects including canals, bridges, mills, and harbours Smeaton’s work is still studied by engineering students today.

John A. Roebling

Born in 1806 in Prussia, John August Roebling attended the Royal Building Academy in Berlin where he studied engineering and architecture and where he first became interested in the challenges of the suspension bridge.

His requests to build a suspension bridge were declined for many years and he moved to America in 1837 where he became the one of the founding fathers of Saxonburg, Pennsylvania. Beginning his career with the Pennsylvania Canal System, Roebling’s dream finally became a reality in 1844 when he built a suspension bridge in Pittsburgh and became America’s leading expert on suspension bridges.

Gustave Eiffel

Born in 1832 in Dijon approximately 200 years after bets for horse racing became popular, Frenchman Alexander Gustave Eiffel is certainly most well-known for the 300m tower in Paris which bears his name.

While the now iconic Eiffel Tower was only ever meant to be a temporary structure, Gustave Eiffel was throughout his career more well-known for his innovative ironwork bridges, cast iron, and railway stations. Eiffel also travelled to far flung countries for projects and his most well-known work before the construction of the Eiffel Tower was the observatory at Nice which was completed in 1886.

Squire Whipple

Known as the “Father of Iron Bridge Building”, Squire Whipple was born in in Hardwick Massachusetts and graduated from the private Union College in New York. He quickly became known as a highly skilled bridge builder and he is particularly celebrated for the bowstring arch truss design which he patented in 1841.

Several of Squire’s bridges are still in existence today, many of which are still in use, and a particularly beautiful example can be found in Albany, New York.

Isambard Kingdom Brunel

Considered to be one of the most ingenious and prolific figures in the history of engineering, Isambard Kingdom Brunel was born in 1806 in Portsmouth, England and became one of the greatest contributors to the Industrial Revolution.

Brunel is best known for his work on the Great Western Railway which was completed in 1838 and connected London with the Midlands and most of Wales and his bridges and tunnels could be found all over Great Britain.

Top 5 Mysterious Engineering Inventions

While much of today’s technology was impossible just 50 years ago, modern inventions have completely revolutionised life as we know it in the 21st century. From the first motorcar to today’s electric cars, grand ideas have shaped our world, but there are many inventions which never saw the light of day. Join us as we explore 5 engineering inventions shrouded in mystery.

Wirelessly Transmitting Electricity around the World

While many may be familiar with the name Nikola Tesla who is credited with creating many life-altering inventions, not all of his ideas came to fruition. One such idea was a low-cost global power and communication system which Tesla hoped would wirelessly power the world.

Tesla was outspoken about this idea from the mid-1890s and by the end of the 1900, he had secured an investment from banker J.P. Morgan to fund the project. However, J.P. Morgan for reasons unknown withdrew the funding and the project was subsequently abandoned in 1906.

A Machine to Peer into the Past

In 1972, some strange news arose from the Vatican in Rome of a machine invented by Father Pellegrino Maria Ernetti in the 1950s. Revealed in an Italian newspaper, the details of this secret machine known as Chronovision shocked the world entirely as it claimed to allow users to see into the past.

Ernetti was originally a physicist and he apparently took the Chronovision machine with him to the Vatican when he later became a priest and many believe that the machine is still kept in the vaults of the Vatican today – far more mysterious than NZ betting!

An Indestructible Material

Developed in the 1980s by hairdresser and amateur chemist Maurice Ward, this material was believed to withstand extreme heat and acted as both a protectant and insulator. Known as Starlite, Ward claimed that his invention could withstand everything from blowtorches to laser beams, but he took the secrets of the material to his grave when he passed in 2011.

Ward’s family are apparently privy to its composition, but this is as yet unconfirmed.

An Enigmatic Digital Coding System

In 1995, Romke Jan Bernhard Sloot, a Norwegian electronics engineer, claimed to have invented a digital coding system which could compress a video file to just 8kb of data. The computing world was taken by storm and Sloot soon had many offers to purchase the coding system.

However, shortly before the transaction took place, Sloot died of an unexpected heart attack and his claims could never be verified.

The Incredibly Efficient Carburettor

In April 1977, Tom Ogle revealed his invention to the world – a carburettor which massively increased the efficiency of fuel injected engines. Installed into a 1970 Ford Galaxie which typically only achieved 6km per litre, the modified Galaxie could suddenly get 53km per litre of fuel.

Shortly after the carburettor was unveiled, journalist Ron Laytner asked the inventor if was worried about oil companies coming after him and Ogle replied that he was not. Unfortunately, Ogle died under mysterious circumstances just 3 years later and the details of his incredible invention died with him.

4 Great Project Ideas For Engineering Students

Electrical engineering is often seen as the basis of all other types of engineering. Every piece of technology in the modern world runs off of some type of electricity, be it light, sound, electro-magnetic fields, and more. It’s an incredibly important field that new and fascinating projects every year as engineers attempt to make technology for the betterment of humanity.

For those students that want to start a new project in electrical engineering, these are some of the top ideas at the moment.

1. Automated Solar Trackers

Automatic solar trackers are an ambitious project that would allow solar panels to automatically shift toward the sun. Most modern solar farms are set in one direction in order to gain the most light at the brightest points of the day, but they are unable to follow the sun as it moves through the sky, and their total energy output is much lower because of this.

Creating an automated solar tracker would see the panels follow the sun from morning to evening, allowing them to increase their energy output tenfold throughout the day.

2. Automated Anchor Light

Most international regulations require that boasts carry lights during sunset and sunrise, as well as when there is restricted visibility due to weather conditions. The number and colours of the light depend wholly on the vessel they’re attached to.

The idea behind this project is to create a masthead anchor light that turns on and off automatically, and allows other vessels to see exactly where the boat is sitting, even in pitch-black anchorage.

3. Finger Print Security System

Biometric security technology is being heralded as the next stage of modern security. Fingerprints have always been at the forefront of security due to the fact that every human being on the planet has a unique fingerprint.

The idea behind the project is to make a home-based security system that works directly with the person or persons whose fingerprints match with the system. It may first see light in the work place, where employees would simply have their fingerprint scanned when starting the work day, essentially making it a modern version of signing a work ticket in, but with much more flexibility and practicality.

4. Electronic Notepad

The intention of this project is to create an electronic note pad that will be made up with a touchscreen and basic storage memory. The notepad would be used as alternative to paper and as a call against deforestation. It may also be advanced enough for simple games and applications, such as a no deposit casino suite or solitaire.

Not only would the user be able to carry it around with them wherever they go, it would also be able to transfer data between computers and other devices, allowing for notes to be transferred and saved instantly.

It would have a fast sampling rate and high accuracy, making it perfect for both writing and drawing. An SD card will be interfaced directly, along with a microcontroller, allowing the user to use for a number of tasks.